Are You A Veteran Suffering From Hearing Loss?

Submit your details to enquire about funding for hearing aids & improve your quality of life

Mental Health

A lot of people don’t realise that there is a strong link between loss of hearing, tinnitus and mental health issues! The mental health illnesses linked to hearing loss and tinnitus are depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and can cause episodes of extreme anger and give suicidal thoughts!

Here to Help

We feel as a Foundation that we have to not only support veterans on their hearing pathway, but also provide support for tinnitus and related mental health issues. It is important that we offer protection for veterans hearing to prevent or delay the impact a hearing loss causes, and we are aware through research that hearing well with the correct hearing aids can have a fabulously positive impact on the wearer and their mental health.

Access to mental health support, respite, or physical activity can have a massively positive impact on the veteran and this is what we hope to achieve by partnering with likeminded colleagues and partners.

Key Research

1. According to an April 2014 study published in JAMA Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, 11.4% of adults with self-reported hearing impairment have moderate to severe depression, significantly higher than the 5.9% prevalence for those with typical hearing.

Individuals with hearing loss have reported feeling socially inept in group settings, entering conversations at inappropriate times, talking off-topic, or dominating conversations and coming across as rude simply because talking is easier than listening. When a person cannot hear properly, engaging in conversations is a daily struggle, and can lead to social isolation and depression.

Other factors that increase the risk of depression include being female, low-income, a current smoker, binge drinking, having fair or poor health status, trouble seeing, and sleep disorder. However, even controlling for these factors, those with hearing impairment still had significantly higher rates of depression than those without hearing impairment. In people 65 and older, hearing impairment is among the most common chronic conditions associated with depression.

2. In addition to depression, hearing loss has been linked to schizophrenia. Several studies support the social defeat hypothesis, which proposes that social exclusion and loneliness can predispose people to schizophrenia by increasing sensitization of the dopamine system.

In a December 2014 study published in JAMA Psychology, participants with hearing loss reported significantly more feelings of social defeat than healthy controls. Though their psychotic symptoms were similar to the control group, exposing them to a stimulant drug showed that those with hearing loss had significantly higher than normal dopamine sensitivity. Further studies are needed to draw definite conclusions of the causation, but this research is a first step in understanding the relationship between hearing impairment, social defeat, and psychosis.

3. In older adults, hearing loss is associated with cognitive decline and dementia, according to a February 2013 study published in JAMA Internal Medicine and several other studies conducted at Johns Hopkins University. The scientists concluded that reduced social engagement and a cognitive load focused on coping with hearing loss rather than higher level thinking can lead to poorer cognitive functioning and faster mental decline. Hearing aids could possibly be a simple fix to increase healthy brain function in the older adult population and reduce the risk of dementia.

4. Exposure to noise often results in tinnitus instead of or in addition to hearing loss, which can also contribute to a range of psychological disorders. Tinnitus affects about 1 in 5 people in the U.S., and causes permanent ringing in the ears. Though research for therapies is ongoing, there is currently no cure. Without therapy, constant ringing in the ears can be debilitating; it can affect job performance, cause insomnia, and provoke fear, anxiety, and anger. This can lead to depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and can exasperate post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Partially & Fully Funded

You will receive a free Hearing Test, all funding for your new Hearing Aids and any accessories you might need! Tinnitus support is also available at no cost!

3 Years Guarantee

All our hearing technology comes with a 3 year guarantee & hearing aids with a 3 month exchange programme, ensuring your hearing aids are just right for you!

Extensive Aftercare

Once you have received your new hearing aids, we continue to offer you support at any time. This includes 3 years of expert aftercare to ensure 100% satisfaction.

Improved Quality Of Life

Our expert can select the best hearing aid systems, tailored specifically to suit your hearing needs. You can then enjoy a new and improved quality of life!

How We Can Help

We get our funding from multiple sources ensuring our veterans get the treatments they need. We can help you gain access to this funding with continuous support along the way. We endeavour to make sure that your application is submitted with the highest level of quality and success rate possible, so we can get you hearing with some fantastic new Hearing Aids as soon as possible.

If you would like to start your application – Click Here To Make An Enquiry >>

Gold arned force service award

Proudly supporting those who serve!

UK Veterans Hearing Help (now the UK Veterans Hearing Foundation) received the Bronze Award in the Defence Employer Recognition Scheme in 2016, in 2019 we achieved Silver level and in 2020 we achieved the highest level Gold. The scheme provides an award for organisations that pledge, demonstrate or advocate support to defence and armed forces community.

Think You May Be Entitled To Partial or Full Funding For Veterans?

Then contact us using the either of the methods below and we will guide you through the process – simply, from start to finish.

Who We Support:

Associations:

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